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As a result of the low transmission rates and high vaccination rates in Barrington, Barrington Public Schools is making changes to our quarantine requirements. All changes are currently aligned to the guidance of the RIDOH.

đź’«PEOPLE WHO ARE NOT VACCINATED / NOT FULLY VACCINATED

Close Contact Change for Those Not Vaccinated - Return on Day 8 With Test

  1. Quarantine for 7 days with a Binax or PCR test on day 5 or later, and return to school with a negative test on day 8. (Replaces the 10-day quarantine)

Travel Quarantine for Those Not Vaccinated (if state is on the list for >5% positivity rate)- Return on Day 8 With Test if symptom free

  1. Quarantine for 7 days with a Binax or PCR test on day 5 or later, and return to school with a negative test on day 8. (Replaces the 10-day quarantine)

Even after ending your quarantine, watch for symptoms for a full 14 days.

Close Contact in the Home for Those Not Vaccinated -Return on Day 21 with Test

  1. No Changes. Quarantine begins after day 10 of the positive household member’s quarantine and lasts for 10 days, with testing required on day 8 or later of the close contact’s quarantine.

People Who Do Not Want to Test and Are Not Vaccinated Require a 14 Day Quarantine with Return on Day 15

đź’«PEOPLE WHO ARE FULLY VACCINATED

Close Contact Change for Those Vaccinated

  1. No quarantine with proof of full vaccination (2 weeks after 2nd Pfizer or Moderna or 2 weeks after Johnson and Johnson)

Travel Quarantine for Those Vaccinated

  1. No quarantine with proof of full vaccination prior to trip (2 weeks after 2nd Pfizer or Moderna or 2 weeks after Johnson and Johnson)

Close Contact in the Home for Those Vaccinated

  1. No quarantine with proof of full vaccination (2 weeks after 2nd Pfizer or Moderna or 2 weeks after Johnson and Johnson). In school Binax for 5 days.

The CDC always recommends:

  • Watch for symptoms for a full 14 days.
  • Vaccinated close contacts and travelers should consider getting a COVID-19 test between 5 and 10 days after their last exposure or out-of-state travel.

If you get symptoms of COVID-19, isolate at home, call your healthcare provider, and get a COVID-19 test.

Travel restrictions change each week, on Monday. Please visit this RIDOH link to learn if a destination that you traveled to falls under Rhode Island quarantine requirements.

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Preventing Eye Strain

  

Dear Parents/Guardians,

Screen time can put considerable strain on the eyes. Signs of eye strain include eyes that feel dry, tired and/or blurred vision. In addition, head/neck or shoulder pain can develop with too much time sitting and using digital devices.

Below is some information from WebMD about eye strain and how to prevent it. Of course, limiting your child’s usual recreational tech time beyond what is required for distance learning may also be helpful.

Why Do Screens Cause Eye Strain?

Normally, we blink about 15-20 times a minute. That spreads tears evenly over your eyes, which keeps them from getting dry and irritated. Researchers have found that people blink less than half as often when they’re reading, watching, or playing on a screen. Also, the contrast of text against the background, the glare, and flickering from digital screens can be hard on your eyes.

Prevent Digital Eye Strain

No, you don’t have to cut out all screen time. But a few changes to how you use your devices can be easier on your eyes.

  • Make sure your computer screen is about 25 inches, or an arm's length, away from your face. The center of the screen should be about 10-15 degrees below eye level.
  • Cut glare by using a matte screen filter. You can find them for all types of computers, phones, and tablets.
  • Follow the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, look at an object at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.
  • Take a longer break of about 15 minutes after every 2 hours you spend on your devices.
  • Use artificial tears to refresh your eyes when they feel dry.
  • Try putting a humidifier in the room where you most often use a computer or other device.
  • Make sure the lighting in the room you’re in is bright enough. You don’t want your device to be brighter than the surroundings.
  • If you wear contact lenses, give your eyes a break by wearing your glasses.
  • Get regular eye exams. You might need to use a different pair of glasses when you’re working on a computer (this one may be difficult at this point in time).

Adjust Your Devices

You can also make sure your devices are set for eye health.

  • Raise the contrast on your screen.
  • Make text larger.
  • Change the brightness of the screen. It shouldn’t be lighter or darker than your surroundings.
  • Lower the color temperature of your screen. That means it will give off less blue light, which is linked to more eyestrain.
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